Thursday, June 4, 2020

The Power of Literature Essay - 550 Words

The Power of Literature (Essay Sample) Content: NameProfessorTitleDate []The Power of LiteratureLiterature has been widely known to bring issues that concern society into life; these include day to day events and things that humans relate with. For example, literature has been used by literary giants to speak of their experiences in their interactions, to tell of peopleà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s cultures and even to correct behavior. Literature is a great influence in the lives of people and brings into perspective the society as a whole."A Devoted Sonà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ , a story by Anita Desai is a piece of writing that demonstrates the power of literature. This story is about a father and son and how their relationship changes. Rakesh, the son, is a child that makes his parents happy by getting the best education in the United States, becoming a doctor and going back o his home place. After returning, he makes his parent even more proud by showing that his morals were not affected negatively in America by agreeing to marry the gir l that his parents have chosen for him. This shows his devotion to his parents. Though he ends up becoming the richest doctor in his neighborhood, he still manages to be the humble son that his parents expect.His mother later died, leaving him to care for his sick father. Rakesh, being the doctor he is and wanting his fatherà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s health, he restricts his fatherà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s diet. This does not auger well with the old man and soon devises ways to please him by eating what he is not supposed to. When Rakesh finds out, he disagrees with him. Their dispute lasts since his father tells him that he does not want to live anymore due to the death of his wife. He does not take medication. This angers Rakesh and he even stops seeing at some point. Here, literature is not only used to give the discrepancies in the age gap, but also document a normal relationship between a father and a son. Rakesh is shown as a very devoted son who obeys his parents to the latter but later falls out with his father after the death of his mother. The power of literature therefore is seen here as a binder and voice of familial values and relationships.The power of literature can also be seen in the story of Hamlet by William Shakespeare. This story is what is referred to as tragedy in the literal quarters. It is a play. Hamlet is a Prince of Denmark who constantly broods about humanity and death. Allegory, imagery and symbolism are used at great lengths. This comes up more so when the protagonist holds a skull. The power of literature is used here to give religious beliefs and behavior of different people in the society. For instance, Hamlet can be seen to be a very superstitious ... The Power of Literature Essay - 550 Words The Power of Literature (Essay Sample) Content: NameProfessorTitleDate []The Power of LiteratureLiterature has been widely known to bring issues that concern society into life; these include day to day events and things that humans relate with. For example, literature has been used by literary giants to speak of their experiences in their interactions, to tell of peopleà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s cultures and even to correct behavior. Literature is a great influence in the lives of people and brings into perspective the society as a whole."A Devoted Sonà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ , a story by Anita Desai is a piece of writing that demonstrates the power of literature. This story is about a father and son and how their relationship changes. Rakesh, the son, is a child that makes his parents happy by getting the best education in the United States, becoming a doctor and going back o his home place. After returning, he makes his parent even more proud by showing that his morals were not affected negatively in America by agreeing to marry the gir l that his parents have chosen for him. This shows his devotion to his parents. Though he ends up becoming the richest doctor in his neighborhood, he still manages to be the humble son that his parents expect.His mother later died, leaving him to care for his sick father. Rakesh, being the doctor he is and wanting his fatherà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s health, he restricts his fatherà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s diet. This does not auger well with the old man and soon devises ways to please him by eating what he is not supposed to. When Rakesh finds out, he disagrees with him. Their dispute lasts since his father tells him that he does not want to live anymore due to the death of his wife. He does not take medication. This angers Rakesh and he even stops seeing at some point. Here, literature is not only used to give the discrepancies in the age gap, but also document a normal relationship between a father and a son. Rakesh is shown as a very devoted son who obeys his parents to the latter but later falls out with his father after the death of his mother. The power of literature therefore is seen here as a binder and voice of familial values and relationships.The power of literature can also be seen in the story of Hamlet by William Shakespeare. This story is what is referred to as tragedy in the literal quarters. It is a play. Hamlet is a Prince of Denmark who constantly broods about humanity and death. Allegory, imagery and symbolism are used at great lengths. This comes up more so when the protagonist holds a skull. The power of literature is used here to give religious beliefs and behavior of different people in the society. For instance, Hamlet can be seen to be a very superstitious ...

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Angry Americans How The 2008 Crash Fueled A Political...

Angry Americans: How the 2008 Crash Fueled a Political Rebellion, Victoria Stilwell and Sarah McGregor, March, 1 2016 Bloomberg Americans are revolting in the primaries by either voting for Trump or supporting Sanders because they don’t believe the American economy is fine. Unemployment is at an eight-year low but labor force participation is down. There has been six years of uninterrupted growth but at a pace that won’t close the economy’s output gap until 2026. Wage growth is getting higher but not by much. Statistics like these explain why the 2007 – 2009 recession is still present in the electoral scene. After the worst collapse and weakest recovery, many Americans seem eager to listen to the Sanders critique of wealth distribution or Trump’s argument against trade. Families are skeptical of claims that the recession is over or that the US has recovered. They feel that they haven’t recovered are or worse off than they were before. According to Doug Holtz-Eakin, president of the center-right American Action Forum and a former director of the Congressional Budget Office, it’s an inconsistency between what is actually happening in their everyday lives and what they’re hearing which is why people are so angry. Trump and Sanders are using that anger to challenge the management of America’s economy at a more fundamental level than other candidates. Sanders, a self-proclaimed democratic socialist, focuses on the internal disparities. He’s promised to break up the largest

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Post Natal Care and Management-Free-Samples-Myassignmenthelp

Question: Providing a Comprehensive Evaluation of the Post-Operative Postnatal Progress and Care of the Woman. Answer: Introduction: The prenatal and postnatal care or the lack thereof for the women who have had Caesarean section and are pregnant again for the second time or have experiences complications during the surgery is a major public health priority, especially for the single woman. One of the major complications that the pregnant women face in the current times is the preterm labour or premature delivery. Preterm labour can be defined as the phenomenon when the baby is born before the 37 weeks of gestation is completed, there can be various contributing factors leading to preterm labour like recurrent preterm birth, extreme anxiety or stress, excessive smoking, cervical exhaustion, infections, etc. The rate of preterm birth has been increasing rapidly, and just in the past decade the rate has jumped close to 30% (MacIntyre et al., 2012). This case study selected for this assignment explains in detail about the medical history of the Yvette, who have had two previous preterm births and is in preterm labour again with various other complications. The woman under consideration in the case scenario had been a heavy smoker and had been caring for two children singlehandedly. Along with that, she had been suffering with whooping cough, UTI and several other infections while in 32 weeks of gestation and had to be admitted to the hospital where she underwent LSCS (Khan et al., 2010). This assignment will attempt to explore the risk factors associated with such scenarios, design a care plan for the newborn and formulate a midwifery care plan for the woman as well. Risk factors associated: According to the case study, the mother, was 32 weeks in gestation and was admitted to the hospital facility, with symptoms like abdominal pain, dysuria, and mild contractions occurring for two days. The medical history includes Group B streptococcus positive urinary tract infection at 26 weeks of pregnancy as well. Along with that her previous two children were both born prematurely close to two years apart; Yvette is extremely stressed and is a heavy smoker with 20 cigarettes a day, and her premature labour is tensing her further. Based on the finding of this case study the two major risk factors that could have positively contributed to her premature labour are smoking and her past history of recurrent preterm births (MacIntyre et al., 2012). There are a variety of adverse effects of smoking on the health and wellbeing of a normal individual, in case of pregnancy however; the risk factors increase multiple folds. According to a large number of exploratory study, smokers were found to be on an elevated risk of pre term delivery, along with that, the risk for preterm birth increased with the increase in number. For instance, heavy smoker mothers had the greater risk of 24% for very preterm labour, 28% for spontaneous birth, and 28% of medically indicated preterm labour. However, the exact pathway through which smoking escalates the risk for preterm birth is not completely known yet (Khan et al., 2010). Although extensive research has discovered that excessive concentration of nicotine and carbon monoxide in the system, compromising the placental blood flow, which in turn disrupts the vasoconstriction of the placental vessels. Along with that the carbon monoxide present in the tobacco smoke is also known to produce carboxy- hemoglobin interfering with the fetal oxygenation (Tsiartas et al., 2012). The nicotine accumulated in the body system of a smoker is also known to increase the maternal blood pressure and pulse rate, which in turn restricts the blood flow to the fetus. The culmination of all these factors ultimately results in altering the amniotic environment for the fetus and restricts the growth and development of the fetus, leading to the preterm labour; idiopathic preterm labour is also associated with the excessive smoking in pregnant woman and is rightfully considered one of the biggest risk factors to preterm delivery in woman (Olsson, Ahlsn Eriksson, 2016). Another highly impactful risk factors in this case scenario that could have contributed to Yvette having to undergo third preterm birth by the means of lower segment caesarean section is her past history of recurrent preterm labour. Recurrent labour can be defined as the occurrence of two or more births before the 37 weeks of gestation can be completed. Various studies have suggested that the occurrence of previous spontaneous preterm labour increases the risk of the next pregnancy to be preterm as well, however in case of preterm labour associated with preeclampsia, the statistics may vary (Pryhuber et al., 2015). Hence it can be suggested that her previous history of premature birth following preeclampsia followed by second premature delivery due to preterm labour increased the risk factor for her indicated preterm pre labour rupture of membranes or PROM. Authors have discussed the cervical insufficiency resulting from the occurrence of more than one preterm delivery to be the cont ributing factor behind the indicated recurrent preterm labour (Henderson et al., 2012). Cervical insufficiency is the result of early cervical ripening caused by the loss of connective tissue or intrauterine infection which has been present in case of the woman under consideration. Therefore it can be concluded that the post operative cervical ripening due to more than one preterm surgical delivery has been one of the greatest risk factors for Yvette, and coupled with excessive anxiety, smoking, and infections propelled her towards her third PROM (Russell et al., 2014). Care plan for Sam Currently, the newborn baby Sam is undergoing investigation in nursery, as he is a premature baby. He is also undergoing treatment for acute infection. Sam is at increased risk of infection owing to the immunological immaturity and the UTI infection from mother. In addition to infection the preterm babies are at risk of respiratory distress, hypothermia and hyperthermia due to ambient temperature changes. According to Drysdale et al. (2014), respiratory distress is related to lung immaturity and low surfactant produced. The premature babies are also at risk of impaired sensory, auditory functions. Thus, the care plan for Sam include the following To ensure thermal homeostasis the infant will be placed in the warmer and isolette incubator and ensure that the baby has appropriate clothing. The carer may dry Sam thoroughly and discard the wet blanket soon. This process may prevent heat loss from evaporation. The baby must not be positioned on close surface. Sam may have cold stress due to hypothermia and hyperthermia may cause respiratory distress, thus regular monitoring of the temperature is needed. The care provider must provide medication as prescribed to prevent seizures associated with hypethermia (Drysdale et al., 2014). The breast milk can be instilled that is the expressed breast milk (EBM) to maintain body nutrients. It is because Sam may be at risk of imbalanced nutrition as a consequent of low glucose, iron and calcium reserve in the premature baby. As the premature babies have high rate of metabolism and inadequate calorie intake, they have low glycogen stores. Thus, it is mandatory to assess the input and output as well as blood sugar level (risk of hypoglycemia), weight and serum sodium (Green et al., 2015). The baby will be nil by mouth and on IV therapy to restore fluids. As the baby preterm, the careers must insert the nasogastric tube. The rationale for this is the premature babies, who are also prone to fluid and electrolyte imbalances caused by environmental factors and loss through lungs, skin,urine and skin. In case of edema, the fluid volume should be adjusted accordingly. Usually the preterm babies can concentrate urine to ~ 600 mOsm/L (Green et al., 2015). The baby must be regularly assessed for the BP, TPR and ascultate breath sounds to track the spread of infection. Therefore, the baby must be monitored for fever, vomiting, jaundice, urine with blood, cloudy urine or unpleasant-smelling urine. Since the baby already have an acute infection, there is a need of antibiotic therapy (IV antibioticss) as it inhibits the growth of bacteria. The UTI infection is usually treated within two to three days. Until the infection is cured breast, milk should be stopped to void further infections. Further, there is a need of identification and treatment of the voiding dysfunction. Evaluating the condition and based on the childs clinical judgment, the imaging evacuation of the urinary tract can be individualised. The UTI infection from mother can impose the risk of kidney in Sam. Thus, the baby must be assessed for the Kidney function (Vachharajani et al., 2015). It must be ensured in the nursery that all the people coming in contact with the baby maintain hand washing protocol to prevent infection. Sterilised equipments should be used to make necessary assessments (Olsson et al., 2016). Further, the neonate must be monitored for the signs of poor skin turgor, dehydration, ad sunken eyeballs for medical intervention. The babys eyes must be covered with patches while under the phototherapy lights to prevent retinal damage. Regular inspection of eyes is necessary to facilitate treatment for purulent conjunctivitis. The care provider in the intensive care unit must position Sam on side with rolled blanket at his back as this position facilitates breathing. As per Pryhuber et al. (2015), immaturity also leads to fragile skin. To prevent the superficial burns on skin avoid oily applications and repositioning is needed every two hours to avoid pressure areas (Russell et al., 2014). Lastly, the mother should be trained on the implications of the infection and the precautions to be taken to avoid further infections. Proper guideline must be given regarding care, handling of the baby and nutrition and the symptoms that need immediate medical intervention. Postnatal care and management for Yvette: Preterm birth is considered to be one of the most common pregnancy related complication ad a vast majority of the young mothers suffer from this particular complication. Although a preterm delivery is generally highly complicated and there are a number of risk factors associated with the preterm labour (Mercer, 2012). Hence even after the delivery, the preterm birth mothers face dire need of ongoing care and support both medical and psychological from the post natal care providers. Although the nursing acre professions will assist the woman with the pharmacological care needs and requirements the midwives can help the mother deal with other related complications after the preterm birth that will help her recover faster and care for herself and her child much better. One of the greatest challenges that a mother post preterm delivery include the infection, pain, confusion, anxiety, and most of helplessness in controlling her grievances. The midwives can provide immense psychological support along with guiding the mother with the care needs of herself and her baby. He care and management that Yvette will receive from the post natal obstetric staff or midwives in particular, include kangaroo care, postpartum pain management, psychological and social support including anxiety management, successful lactation, family centred care and guidance for planning future pregnancy (Lamont et al., 2011). Kangaroo care can be defined as the skin to skin contact of the mother with her newborn dressed only in a cap and diaper, and for the preterm babies in the neonatal intensive care unit, this technique is highly beneficial facilitating improved breastfeeding rates, stable body temperature for the new born, decreased hospital stays, and improved neurological development of the newborn (Di Renzo et al., 2011). And as the preterm babies lack in body weight and slow growth rates, this technique is even more beneficial for the preterm babies. In this technique the midwife will train Yvette to hold her neonate on her chest providing skin to skin contact which will regulate the babys body temperature decreasing the risk for preterm hypothermia and will train the other in readily accessible breastfeeding when need be. The second support that the woman under consideration for the assignment will receive from the midwives is regarding post partum pain management which is a very common occurrence following a LSCS (Flenady et al., 2013). The immediate relief intervention that the woman can achieve include lateral recumbent position, relaxation techniques like breathing exercises, back rubs, therapeutic touch exercise and administration of mild analgesics as directed by the registered midwife. Successful lactation is one of the most vital parts of the post natal care management and for good health of both the mother and the newborn. According to the American academy of paediatrics, the human milk is absolutely necessary for adequate growth and development of the baby. Although the mothers that give preterm deliveries face the challenge of successful lactation and maintaining adequate milk supply. The midwife can train Yvette the hand pumping technique to increase the milk supply, along with monitoring the breast health and milk production of the mother regularly to avoid mastitis or candidiasis as consequences of excessive pumping. Periodic breast massage is also a caring tactic that midwives take in order to help the preterm mothers increase their milk production rate (Flenady et al., 2013). Post partum depression and anxiety has emerged as one of the major maternal health and wellbeing priorities and Yvette, the woman under consideration for this assignment has already been dealing with excessive stress, anxiety and depression while being a single mother with two infants and a neonatal newborn, psychological support is one of the mandates in this situation. In case of NICE screening for postnatal anxiety and depression is one of the mandatory protocols; though there is not much for the midwives to do in clinical care, therapeutic management can be given to Yvette effectively by midwifery professional. Counselling and relaxation therapies engaging active communication and compassionate support can help the mother overcome her depression and fears and concentrate on keeping herself and her child healthy (Neilson, West Dowswell, 2014). Lastly overall guidance and training for preplanned future pregnancy and social support given by the midwife to the preterm mother, Yvette for this case scenario, has been proven to reduce the risk of post partum depression and anxiety along with the risk of recurrent preterm birth. The midwife will engage Yvette in a proper woman education regarding the risk factors of safe time gap between the next pregnancy and contraceptive techniques ensuring the best health for the mother and her children at large (Wylie et al., 2011). Proper social support of counselling and day care for her children, while she is in the hospital, will also be discussed with Yvette by the midwife. However, there are a few precautionary assessments that the midwife will engage the woman because of the infections that she had been suffering with. As per the case study, there is need for a few blood tests needed for testing the infection status of the whooping cough and the group B streptococcus infection like the CBC or complete blood count test. The temperature of the woman needs to be monitored periodically because of her infections. As Yvette has had whooping cough before the delivery, the midwife will also need to restrict the woman from visiting the newborn until all her infections are reduced. For her C-section, the incision site will be monitored regularly by the midwife for any signs of infection and any irregular bleeding should be monitored diligently as well, along with any impending fever. Conclusion: On a concluding note, it can be stated that the rate of preterm births have been increasing a at a rapid rate over the years and there are a myriad of risk factors that facilitate the preterm labour in women. For instance, in this case scenario where Yvette had suffered through two previous preterm deliveries and different infections and had to suffer through another preterm birth followed by a LSCS surgery. The anxiety and fear that Yvette had been experiencing had been very natural given the circumstances she went through as a single mother without any support, although continuing smoking had been one of the major contributing factors that propelled her towards the complications for the most part. However, it must not escape notice that optimal compassionate care and support has the potential to help her overcome the crisis situation and attain speedy recovery for both herself and her premature child. This assignment has discussed three of the key factors associated with the premature birth in the current age, the risk factors contributing to preterm birth, the postnatal care and management for the neonate and post natal care and management for the mother. It can be hoped that the care techniques and management outlined in the assignment will be beneficial in helping Yvette gain proper health in no time along with her newborn child. References: Di Kenyon, S., Boulvain, M., Neilson, J. P. (2010). Antibiotics for preterm rupture of membranes.Cochrane Database Syst Rev,8(8). Di Renzo, G. C., Roura, L. C., Facchinetti, F., Antsaklis, A., Breborowicz, G., Gratacos, E., ... Radunovic, N. (2011). Guidelines for the management of spontaneous preterm labor: identification of spontaneous preterm labor, diagnosis of preterm premature rupture of membranes, and preventive tools for preterm birth.The Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine,24(5), 659-667. Drysdale, S. B., Alcazar, M., Wilson, T., Smith, M., Zuckerman, M., Lauinger, I. L., ... Greenough, A. (2014). Respiratory outcome of prematurely born infants following human rhinovirus A and C infections. European journal of pediatrics, 173(7), 913-919. Flenady, V., Hawley, G., Stock, O. M., Kenyon, S., Badawi, N. (2013). Prophylactic antibiotics for inhibiting preterm labour with intact membranes. The Cochrane Library. Green, J., Darbyshire, P., Adams, A., Jackson, D. (2015). Looking like a proper baby: nurses' experiences of caring for extremely premature infants. Journal of clinical nursing, 24(1-2), 81-89. Henderson, J. J., McWilliam, O. A., Newnham, J. P., Pennell, C. E. (2012). Preterm birth aetiology 20042008. Maternal factors associated with three phenotypes: spontaneous preterm labour, preterm pre-labour rupture of membranes and medically indicated preterm birth.The Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine,25(6), 642-647. Lamont, R. F., Nhan-Chang, C. L., Sobel, J. D., Workowski, K., Conde-Agudelo, A., Romero, R. (2011). Treatment of abnormal vaginal flora in early pregnancy with clindamycin for the prevention of spontaneous preterm birth: a systematic review and metaanalysis.American journal of obstetrics and gynecology,205(3), 177-190. MacIntyre, D. A., Sykes, L., Teoh, T. G., Bennett, P. R. (2012). Prevention of preterm labour via the modulation of inflammatory pathways.The Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine,25(sup1), 17-20. Mercer, B. (2012). Antibiotics in the management of PROM and preterm labor. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics, 39(1), 65-76. Neilson, J. P., West, H. M., Dowswell, T. (2014). Betamimetics for inhibiting preterm labour. The Cochrane Library. Olsson, E., Ahlsn, G., Eriksson, M. (2016). Skin?to?skin contact reduces near?infrared spectroscopy pain responses in premature infants during blood sampling. Acta Paediatrica, 105(4), 376-380. Pryhuber, G. S., Maitre, N. L., Ballard, R. A., Cifelli, D., Davis, S. D., Ellenberg, J. H., ... Ren, C. (2015). Prematurity and respiratory outcomes program (PROP): study protocol of a prospective multicenter study of respiratory outcomes of preterm infants in the United States. BMC pediatrics, 15(1), 37. Reiss, I., Schaible, T., van den Hout, L., Capolupo, I., Allegaert, K., van Heijst, A., ... Tibboel, D. (2010). Standardized postnatal management of infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia in Europe: the CDH EURO Consortium consensus.Neonatology,98(4), 354-364. Reynolds, L. P., Caton, J. S. (2012). Role of the pre-and post-natal environment in developmental programming of health and productivity.Molecular and cellular endocrinology,354(1), 54-59. Russell, G., Sawyer, A., Rabe, H., Abbott, J., Gyte, G., Duley, L., Ayers, S. (2014). Parents views on care of their very premature babies in neonatal intensive care units: a qualitative study. BMC pediatrics, 14(1), 230. Sweet, D. G., Carnielli, V., Greisen, G., Hallman, M., Ozek, E., Plavka, R., ... Halliday, H. L. (2013). European consensus guidelines on the management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants-2013 update. Neonatology, 103(4), 353-368. Tsiartas, P., Holst, R. M., Wennerholm, U. B., Hagberg, H., Hougaard, D. M., Skogstrand, K., ... Jacobsson, B. (2012). Prediction of spontaneous preterm delivery in women with threatened preterm labour: a prospective cohort study of multiple proteins in maternal serum.BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics Gynaecology,119(7), 866-873. Vachharajani, A., Vricella, G. J., Najaf, T., Coplen, D. E. (2015). Prevalence of upper urinary tract anomalies in hospitalized premature infants with urinary tract infection. Journal of Perinatology, 35(5), 362. Van Der Ham, D. P., Vijgen, S. M., Nijhuis, J. G., Van Beek, J. J., Opmeer, B. C., Mulder, A. L., ... Bloemenkamp, K. W. (2012). Induction of labor versus expectant management in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes between 34 and 37 weeks: a randomized controlled trial. PLoS medicine, 9(4), e1001208. Wylie, L., Hollins Martin, C. J., Marland, G., Martin, C. R., Rankin, J. (2011). The enigma of post?natal depression: an update.Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing,18(1), 48-58

Sunday, April 19, 2020

Softball, not only a sport but my life. free essay sample

Life is like a sporting event. The effort you put into practice are the result you see in the final event. There are both positives and negatives, but I have discovered that when things are negative is when you learn the most and grow as a player and as a person. In any sport you have people that will influence you that are on you team and your opponents. I have learned that once you get passed the obstacles, you flourish as a person. To me softball just hasn’t been a sport it has been my life and at times all I really had to look forward to. Throughout middle school softball really wasn’t my thing but once I got into high school it turned into my sport the only thing I ever wanted to do. It was the only sport that had ever challenged me mentally and made me learn real life lessons as well. We will write a custom essay sample on Softball, not only a sport but my life. or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page My freshman year was the hardest year of my life especially the beginning. My rock the person I looked up to had gotten remarried and was moving out of the state to West Virginia. My dad leaving had impacted me greatly leaving me feeling lonely and upset about things I never had been upset about before. But luckily for me I found an outlet that helped me get through my struggles as a person. When I felt sad I had a team to make me smile, or mad I had something different to focus on. Softball taught me to trust people more and be more open. Softball at that point in life was not just a sport but it was my life my only way of feeling satisfied with me as a person but also with everything at home. The coaches and teammates I had throughout high school inspired me to be better, push the limit, and strive to be the best. At practice I not only wanted to survive my conditioning workouts but do them to my fullest potential and push the limit. Soon after that I not only found myself wanted to use my fullest potential on the field but with everything I did in life school work, chores, and just at being a friend. I had struggled with two things in softball keeping a positive attitude and hitting. So I kept working on my hitting and got disciplined at the plate only picking pitches I was sure I could get a piece of. This discipline helped me with everything making good decisions, completing my homework to my fullest potential, and being the best person I could possibly be. My positive attitude was harder to work on though. It took me lots of growing up and mental determination to push through only relying on the negatives and look at all the good things I had done. By defeating my negative toughest hurdle I had become an optimistic and positive person. Softball has helped to be determined, be the best possible person I can be, and figure out how to through tough things in life. Constantly being in a competitive environment had helped me in the classroom and with life a lways wanting to be my best. Without softball being there to push me I don’t believe I would be where I am at in my life today, a hardworking confident optimistic person always striving to be my best and work harder to get better at any task I am trying to complete. For me softball was not just a game it was my foundation my everything, something I could never leave behind.

Saturday, March 14, 2020

Ecofeminism Movement essays

Ecofeminism Movement essays One of the most basic tenants of feminist environmentalism is that people's relationships to their environments are differentiated by gender. A review of the ecofeminist movement reveals a deep division between essentialist and anti-essentialist positions that actually obscures the fundamental flaw within the entire movement. Ultimately, the ecofeminist assertion that men and women's relationships to their environments are fundamentally different seems to be fundamentally erroneous, and fails to take into consideration more important factors like race, economics, and Ecofeminism is seen as "a feminist rebellion within male-dominated radical environmentalism" (Sturgeon, 25). Ruether notes "Ecofeminism ... explores how male domination of women and domination of nature are interconnected, both in cultural ideology and in social structures" (2). Essentially, ecofeminism at its most basic definition focuses on the ties that exist between ideologies that result in the degradation and destruction of the environment and ideologies that result in injustices To the feminist environmentalist movement, the idea that humans are somehow separate and hold dominion over nature is problematic. Ruether argues that the humans desire to change the earth itself is symptomatic of this larger issue, rooted in the idea that nature is somehow not divine and subhuman. Instead, Ruether and other feminist environmentalists tent to "assume that the earth forms a living system, of which humans are an inextricable part" (Ruether, 5). Here, humans do not hold dominion over the earth and other forms of life, part are instead an integrated part of Ecofeminism, while it essentially argues that people's relationships to their environments are differentiated by gender, has many different forms. In Ecofeminist Natures: Race, Gender, Feminist Theory, and Political Action, Noel Sturgeon notes tha...

Thursday, February 27, 2020

American Environment History Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

American Environment History - Essay Example These environmental events were selected for these distinctively exhibit the impacts of socio-political and technological activities affect the natural environment. However, this paper acknowledges its limitations as there are other significant environmental phenomenon across the history of the U.S. Dust Bowl The Dust Bowl in the U.S. during the 1930s was an environmental disaster characterized by the erosion of the large portion of the Great Plains. Dust storms have brushed off top soils resulting in a 75 percent loss of the original land in the 1940s (Hornbeck 2012). This phenomenon affected Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, and Texas, whose lands dried up and blown away. Simply, the drought in this area caused the soil to dry up and converted into dust (Heinrichs 7). The Dust Bowl phenomenon has caused massive damages to the lives, properties, and livelihood of the people in the Great Plains during the 20th century. This environmental catastrophe may be associated with the i ncreasing development of the country. Prior to the incident, the Great Plains was considered to be a conducive area for living. Thus, human civilization and activities transformed the grassland into settlements (Porter 20). This is the first manifestation of how technology and advancement may reshape the conditions of the environment. Further activities and development in the area includes the rise of their economy, whereby encouraging the increase of population. As people inhabited the area, technological advancements like trains and farming activities were visible and increasing in the Great Plains (Porter 20). These human activities together with the improper land use contributed to the existence of the Dust Bowl. Again, this demonstrates how advancements and industrialization affect the environment. In effect of these poor practices and the drought, dusts were wiped of the land surface that covered most of the Plains. This has damaged agricultural land and domestication, which i n turn impact the lives and livelihood of many families in the Plains. Hence, food production in the area has become very difficult. For instance, 50 percent of the cattle in the Great Plains were destroyed while the others were given to the Federal Surplus Relief Corporation as it has become unfit for consumption (Timeline). Nuclear Power Generation Nuclear power is a technological advancement from aid communities in generating electricity at a low cost. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, nuclear energy or power stems from the â€Å"splitting of uranium† or fission, which in turn will produce steam to generate electricity. In the U.S., commercial nuclear power has been one of the most important sources of electricity with a 20 percent contribution to the country’s electricity source from the 90s to today (Rogers 6). Although nuclear power generation has less utilization, it cannot be denied that nuclear power has adverse impacts to the env ironment, which is evident in the environment in the 20th to the early 21st century. However, the country still continues to maximize nuclear power due to low operational costs and high reliability. This technological advancement impacts the environment through thermal pollution. That is, nuclear reactors is capable of producing â€Å"waste heat† (Hester and Harrison 93-94). A nuclear power plant may produce 50 percent more heat than

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

The Development of The American Broadway as Theatre and Culture Research Paper

The Development of The American Broadway as Theatre and Culture - Research Paper Example The American Broadway Musical has enjoyed success since its inception, gradually coming to be recognized as a truly American contribution to theatre. Success is measured in terms of the length of its run on Broadway. In fact â€Å"long runs became the norm for a hit show† (Hischak 2004, 449). Plays such as My Fair Lady 1956, Hello Dolly! 1964, Grease 1972 and Cats 1982 have maintained the record for Broadways longest running musicals (Hanschak 2004, 449). However, Phantom of the Opera enjoyed the longest run of over 8,000 performances between 1987 and 1988 (Hischak 2004, 450). Typically when a Broadway musical enjoys immense success directors are inclined to transfer the production to the big screen. This is obviously an economic incentive in the sense that movie producers anticipate making money from a film version of a successful and popular Broadway production. In return, the Broadway Musical producers are entitled to royalties from the box office returns and in most cases a token advance payment against future royalties (Vogel 2001, 520). However, a successful Broadway musical does not automatically guarantee that the subsequent film version will be equally successful. For instance, The Phantom of the Opera, while immensely successful on Broadway was a relative flop in the cinema. It has been argued that the box office failure may be attributed to the fact that the film version came too late, having gone into film production some twenty years after its first theatrical debut. By that time the momentum and popularity had faded somewhat (Broadway n.d.).à ‚  

Friday, January 31, 2020

Psychiatry and control of human behavior Essay Example for Free

Psychiatry and control of human behavior Essay I. In order to create such a resolution and usually to resolve an ethical dilemma nurses use four fundamental ethical principles of nursing care and practice, which are considered by many experts as a cornerstone of ethical guidelines. Autonomy The first one is autonomy. This principle means that individuals have a right to self-determination, that is, to make decisions about their lives without interference from others (Silva, M. Ludwick, R., 1999b, p. 4). It is also possible to define empirically that autonomy consists of two elements: data acquired or proposed as a presupposition and reaching the decision as the action. Beneficence The second is beneficence. This principle is thought to be a basis of day-to-day nursing care and practice. The principle of beneficence and utilitarianism direct health care professionals to make an ethical decision to provide the maximum benefit and to minimize harm to the greatest number of people involved (Silva, M. Ludwick, R., 1999b, p. 4). Beauchamp and Childress (1994, p. 192) state that Each of three forms of beneficence requires taking action by helping preventing harm, removing harm and promoting good. (cited by Silva, M. and Ludwick, R., 1999b, p. 4). This ethical principle may cause some ethical questions when a dilemma regarding performing of a mentally ill patients wishes appears. Nonmaleficence The third fundamental ethical principle is nonmaleficence or do no harm, which is easily connected with the obligation of a nurse to defend safe keeping of the mentally ill patient. Born out of the Hippocratic Oath, this principle dictates that we do not cause injury to our mentally ill patients (Silva, M. Ludwick, R., 1999b, p. 6). Justice The fourth basic ethical principle is justice. This principle implies giving each person or group what he/she or they are due (Silva, M. Ludwick, R., 1999b, p. 7). This principle applies to parity, integrity or another point that may be fundamental for the justice decision. In nursing care and practice the principle of justice usually centered on rightful admission to nursing care and on rightful allocation of scarce resource. Rightful admission to the care means that nurses are easy of access to provide nursing care and a mentally ill patient as well as any member of a society realizes that nursing care is completely accessible. The principle of justice †¦ guides health care professionals to treat every client with fairness and equity regardless the prognosis of illness, social and economic status of clients, the social and financial consequences impose on others (Wilcockson, M., 1999, p. 21). Though it is necessary to remember what actually has the priority if we will compare it with nurses good, a nurse sometimes mixes up with what the nurse considers to be a mentally ill patients good. It is questionable what composes good for a mentally ill patient without violating his or her autonomy or allowing the mentally ill patient to suffer bitterly. And can it be ethical to abolish the choice of the mentally ill patients. For example Beauchamp and Childress (1994, pp. 277-278) maintain that paternalism can obtain two forms a weak and a strong one. They assert that weak form paternalism implies is that a nurse defends the mentally ill patients good when he or she is incapable to resolve some questions as a consequence of problems like depression or the effect of medicaments. But a strong form of paternalism, they say involves interactions intended to benefit a person despite the fact that the persons risky choices and actions are informed, voluntary, and autonomous (cited by Silva, M. and Ludwick, R., 1999b, p.5). II. In the proposed case study the old lady didnt write DNR order, thus, the nurse behaved just adequately. She remembered about her duty to a mentally ill patient to preserve her autonomy but it was no possibility for her and for her mentally ill patient to identifying and addressing problems in the decision-making process as the lady was too depressed. Her quality of life was decreasing ad she couldnt live independently but it was still questionable were these reasons adequate enough to make end-of-life decision. On this ground it is necessary to investigate the notion of quality of life. This obscure notion implied the situations when decisions concerning the question of withdrawing nursing care are formed and †¦based on the likely low levels of self-awareness, reasoning, communication and activity that the mentally ill patient will have and the low probability of improvement (Thompson, E., Melia, K. M. and Boyd, K. M., 2001, p. 44). Usually it is not up to mentally ill patient to make quality-of-life decisions as they are often reached by doctors or relatives. In other words quality of life should be determined by mentally ill patients themselves being able to evaluate it adequately. The unproved understanding of notion is often used in statements like: After all, we shouldnt waste any more money on this person because their quality of life will be so low, anyway (Hunt, G., 1994, p. 125) Considering the case study we may that the quality of life of the old lady was not so low as to bring to end-of-life solution. However it was up to the mentally ill patient to decide that problem independently as it was her right to create DNR order but she didnt do it, besides her depressed state and, thus, low self-determination was among the main reasons for reasonable nurses acts. III. If we try to use these four fundamental ethical principles to the case study that was chosen for our investigation beforehand we will be able to evaluate the deeds of nurse from ethical point of view. For example, it is clearly evident that nurse violated the principle of autonomy because autonomy of a mentally ill patient means the opportunity to make decisions about his or her life without interference of others. If taking into account this principle then it was up to a seventy three year old woman to decide either she needs to obtain emergency CPR or not. This principle was thus violated by the nurse, and the reasons for such behavior are not deciding in this matter. She might have ignored this principle basing on the other principles that prevent a nurse from doing harm, meaning to rescue the life of her mentally ill patient because human life is valuable and unique. But while the nurse deprived her mentally ill patient of the possibility to choose life or death, the nurse thus made herself responsible for this decision, which is evidently wrong. At least, the nurse should have noted that the mentally ill patient didn’t want to be rescued. As for beneficence, we may suppose, on the other hand, that it was a demonstration of weak form of paternalism. In such case the nurse protected the good of a seventy three year old lady as she was incapable to resolve end-of-life questions as a result of her depression and decreasing of the quality of her life. Consequently the deeds of the nurse were well-taken and righteous. But the nature of the action is also ambivalent, as the nurse might have been directed by her own notion of good, or the notion that the nurse obtained while studying ethics. The nurse shouldn’t have been define independently if the woman was really unable to make reasonable decisions, the nurse must have at least objectively estimate the problems and conditions of the mentally ill patient that led to such mentally ill patient’s intention.   This thought may also be confirmed and at the same time called in question by the principle of nonmaleficence. The nurse protected the safety of her mentally ill patient, but without mentally ill patients wish. It is questionable, would be the note of DNR be regarded as the injury caused to the mentally ill patient. If the life and conditions of this old woman were so poor, they made her suffer; the nurse must have taken it into account while deciding what would be more or less painful for her mentally ill patient. This may be regarded as the intention to take off responsibility from the nurse. Observing the last principle of ethics, justice, it is necessary to note that this principle was violated by the nurse. Her mentally ill patient was at least due to be heard. Her wishes and demands should have been taken into consideration, moreover, the mentally ill patient did not ask to help her die, and she just wanted to prevent her from suffering in future. Thus taking into consideration these four main principles, the case seems to be contradictory. It seems that the nurse acted basing upon her own notion of what is good, safe and just for her mentally ill patient, without taking into account the demands, wishes, living conditions and problems of her mentally ill patient. Of course, definite peculiarities of these principles allow justifying the actions of the nurse, if we look at the situation form the point of view of value of human life. One more issue that should be examined is the absence of mentally ill patient’s order for DNR. This may also be a reason to justify the actions of the nurse. But as soon as the demands was heard by the nurse, the nurse should have defined this problems with the mentally ill patient and helped the woman write a necessary order, if it was her wish. Nurses often cant decide what their actual point of view about some ethical dilemmas is and how far those perceptions go. Anyway nurses should have to do with their own system of moral values but at the same time to determine whether it fits into the big picture (Stacey, J., 1998, p.8). It is necessary for a nurse to take a turn for the better foreshortening of problems and challenges in the area of care by forming at any rate a bifocal view of the problems (Stacey, J., 1998, p.7) Of course, not all ethical dilemmas concern death. Nurses deal with ethics on every eight-hour shift. †¦for example, the Nursing Code of Ethics says to hold all things confidential, but sometimes there is information others need to know, explains Freeman (cited by Stacey, J., 1998, p.4). However nurses often can appear in the situation of resolving of a complex moral dilemma that regards an appeal for assisted death. This problem is one of the most complicated issues in nursing practice. This question is also a key one in the case study that we have in some way already investigated earlier. Given the poor quality of life that seventy-three years old woman would probable suffer she demanded not to perform any heroic measures in the event of cardiac arrest. So she does not want to live anymore. But when the nurse sees the mentally ill patient next she is being resuscitated as there was no Do Not Resuscitate order (DNR) in her notes. Reference List Hunt, G. (1994) Ethical issues in nursing. Routledge. Silva, M. and Ludwick, R (1999a). Ethical Thoughtfulness and Nursing Competency. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 10 December, 1999. Available from http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/ethicol/ethics_2.htm [Accessed 17 February 2006] Silva, M. and Ludwick, R. (1999b). Interstate Nursing Practice and Regulation: Ethical Issues for the 21st Century. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 2 July, 1999. Available from http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/ethicol/ethics_1.htm [Accessed 14 February 2006] Silva, M. and Ludwick, R. (2002). Ethical Grounding for Entry into Practice: Respect, Collaboration, and Accountability. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 30 August, 2002. Available from http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/ethicol/ethics_9.htm [Accessed 14 February 2006] Silva, M. Ludwick, R., (2003) Ethical Challenges in the Care of Elderly Person. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 19 December, 2003. Available from http://nursingworld.org/ojin/ethicol/ethics_14.htm   [Accessed 15 February 2006] Stacey J. (1998) A Question of Ethics. Emory Nursing University[online]. Available from http://www.whsc.emory.edu/_pubs/en/ [Accessed 17 February 2006] Thompson, E., Melia, K. M. and Boyd, K. M. (2001) Nursing Ethics. 4th ed. [n.p.] Wilcockson, M. (1999) Issues of life and death. [n.p.]

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Depicting the Various Traits and Characteristics of Leadership in Liter

Depicting the Various Traits and Characteristics of Leadership in Literature When discussing any triumphant or flourishing organization or institution, the main attribute which will always surface when examining the true fabric of what allows a particular organization or institution to excel, will always be leadership.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Leadership is portrayed at its pinnacle in William Bratton’s Turnaround, Rudolph Giuliani’s book Leadership, Oren Harari’s book The Leadership Secrets of Colin Powell, and David Lipsky’s book Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point. In each of these works, the author does an exceptional job of depicting the various traits and characteristics necessary for being a powerful and effective leader.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   William Bratton, born and raised in Boston, was appointed as New York City’s new police commissioner by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani on December 2, 1993. William Bratton was a leader who spent his whole life turning around low-performing, dysfun-ctional police departments. It was his specialty and it soon became his trademark. Bill Bratton hit the ground running as the commissioner of police by implementing several policies and visions that he had, that many believed would be unfathomable in policing. His goals were revolutionary and unprecedented and would not be possible to achieve if not for his incredible leadership ability. His ability as an effective leader allowed him to select intelligent, experienced, and quality individuals who shared identical beliefs and visions as he did. Any leader would agree that anything is possible through optimism, intelligent planning, and preparation, but nothing is possible if your chosen â€Å"executives† lack the leader’s confid ence to operate freely and carry out the organization’s ultimate goals. Bratton was a believer in Theodore Roosevelt’s ideology that â€Å"the best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self- restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.† Bratton was a master motivator. His optimism rubbed off on everyone around him and this reflected their performance. He had a belief that â€Å"leadership is the ability to enthuse and encourage the people in your organization so highly that, whatever idea is put into action, they embrace it so fully they forget the genesis and assume it was their own† (Bratton pg.155). This was Br... ...spects of what makes up an effective leader, it is clear that there cannot be one clear- cut and dry definition of what a leader is. A leader is a make up of many different attributes and qualities. An effective Leader encompasses all of the attributes which go along with facilitating ideas and allowing an organization to grow and flourish, as well as inspiring and motivating those he or she oversees to do the same. A Leader has the ability and almost the reflex action to surface when it is time for a difficult task to be accomplished or a difficult decision to be made. Leadership may be a type of management but a manager is not always a leader. â€Å"Leadership is the art of accomplishing more than the science of management says is possible.† Works Cited   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Bratton, W., & Knobler, P. (1998). Turnaround: How America’s Top Cop Reversed the Crime Epidemic. New York: Random House Press.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Giuliani, R.W., & Kurson, K. (2002). Leadership. New York: Hyperion Press.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Harari, O. (2002). The Leadership Secrets of Colin Powell. New York: McGraw- Hill Press.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Lipsky, D. (2004). Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point. New York: Vintage Books Press.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

The Sixth Sense Film Analysis

With a close up of the award, the clip begins with our view of the couple only in reflection of Malcolm’s recent award, which is made to seem meaningless as we can’t read the writing despite it being in centre of the frame. The award is in a red frame. This already seems to be warning to both Malcolm and Anna that danger could be heading their way, especially during the reflected close-up shot of the two. It also makes us wonder why this prop appears slanted on the chair.This suggests that the award is a symbol of danger. Also, the red lighting on the couple from the fire leads us to believe that they are now the central target of a dangerous presence. Which we see in upcoming events. The only sound we hear is diegetic, though its very quiet which gives off a calm atmosphere but may also suggest we should be listening for something. In the shot where the couple are reflected in the frame, we see that she is lower down than him showing the characters importance.00:06:08 A wide shot is used to show the scenery and expensive objects. We can see that they are a wealthy couple through the setting. The large living room has what looks to be expensive furnishings and an ornate fireplace as well as a grandfather clock and chandelier in the equally big hallway. We also can assume this as Malcolm is wearing a jumper with a rowing club logo, something we often associate with richer people. The couple then head upstairs and discover the house has been broken into.The setting suddenly becomes dark and we see Anna’s shadow on the wall, She’s positioned to the right in front of the open window showing a dangerous situation, this is also hinted as her back is turned on the dark room insinuating there may be something lurking in the shadows, which is why the lighting is very low key and dull. We hear some diegetic sound though its rather quiet which helps to change the atmosphere from relaxing to a tense and suspicious one.00:06:41 Malcolm approaches his wife to see what the problem is, with this we get a point of view shot, the camera examines the floor before tracking up to the smashed window, the shot lasts approximately 8 seconds and allows us to take in the situation. The phone on the ground makes a beeping noise similar to the sound of a warning alarm which should be seen as a warning in its self. The noise then dies out which links to Malcolm’s life later in the scene.We can assume this scene is centred around Malcolm as it’s his view we’re seeing from, it’s also his bag we see on the floor sprinkled with shattered glass as well as earlier the winning of the award. 00:06:54 A mid-shot Is used to show Malcolm being protective of his wife. As the couple have now taken off there expensive jackets/cover ups it seems they also lost the power that comes with it. 00:07:08 The camera slowly zooms towards Malcolm and straight cuts back to a point of view shot, as this happens we hear the non- diegetic music increasing the tension.As we see Malcolm begin to move we also hear the faint noise of movement from the intruder, this (as well as the camera shot) is allowing the audience to capture that the intruder is standing in the bathroom. We see in a point of view shot to add tension as well as close ups so the audience can see the expression on Malcolm’s face. Though the distance from the bathroom and the position of Malcolm isn’t far at all 13 seconds pass before we discover who is in the room, the time has been stretched out to cause more tension.00:07:13 The first view we get of the bathroom is of the floor as the shot is still from Malcolm’s point of view, the fact we see the floor before the camera moves up shows that he isn’t confident enough to look straight ahead, the shot then is then zoomed out to create a full body shot. it’s obvious the man we see (Vincent) isn’t mentally stable due to the break in, his body language and the fact he’s took the majority of his clothes off, knowing this Malcolm speaks quietly trying to keep a clam atmosphere.As Vincent moves towards the door we hear the diagetic sound return, we also see Malcolm and his wife are aware of the danger, when Vincent moves closer and Malcolm steps back. 00:09:10 A mid-shot frame is used when Vincent starts to become angry and upset making him unpredictable and therefore more of a risk, the pan across Vincent’s face to allow us to see the emotions and then does the same to Malcolm. Vincents body language also tells the audience how unstable he is, one arm  is ‘protecting’ him throughout, he’s also very closed and shrugged which also gives off the sense of fear.The scene becomes very quiet with the only sound being whispers and crying. 00:09:51 A mid-shot is used as Vincent shoots the gun. High key lighting has been used to show whats going on as it’s done very quickly. The loud gunshot comes as a shock to the audience as it’s been very quiet which adds more shock, within seconds Vincent turns the gun on himself.The camera pans while this happens. Malcolm was shot in his rowing jumper, making it ironic that he was shot right in front of his rowing photo in which they all look happy and full of life. 00:10:27 A crane movement is used to end the scene, the screen then fades black and remains silent for a moment before playing the same non-diegetic music as earlier in the scene. The lighting is very dark and the room is a mess which represents the current situation The sixth sense film analysis With a close up of the award, the clip begins with our view of the couple only in reflection of Malcolm’s recent award, which is made to seem meaningless as we can’t read the writing despite it being in centre of the frame. The award is in a red frame. This already seems to be warning to both Malcolm and Anna that danger could be heading their way, especially during the reflected close-up shot of the two. It also makes us wonder why this prop appears slanted on the chair.This suggests that the award is a symbol of danger. Also, the red lighting on the couple from the fire leads us to believe that they are now the central target of a dangerous presence. Which we see in upcoming events. The only sound we hear is diegetic, though its very quiet which gives off a calm atmosphere but may also suggest we should be listening for something. In the shot where the couple are reflected in the frame, we see that she is lower down than him showing the characters importance.A wide sh ot is used to show the scenery and expensive objects. We can see that they are a wealthy couple through the setting. The large living room has what looks to be expensive furnishings and an ornate fireplace as well as a grandfather clock and chandelier in the equally big hallway. We also can assume this as Malcolm is wearing a jumper with a rowing club logo, something we often associate with richer people. The couple then head upstairs and discover the house has been broken into.The setting suddenly becomes dark and we see Anna’s shadow on the wall, She’s positioned to the right in front of the open window showing a dangerous situation, this is also hinted as her back is turned on the dark room insinuating there may be something lurking in the shadows, which is why the lighting is very low key and dull. We hear some diegetic sound though its rather quiet which helps to change the atmosphere from relaxing to a tense and suspicious one.Malcolm approaches his wife to see w hat the problem is, with this we get a point of view shot, the camera examines the floor before tracking up to the smashed window, the shot lasts approximately 8 seconds and allows us to take in the situation. The phone on the ground makes a beeping noise similar to the sound of a warning alarm which should be seen as a warning in its self. The noise then dies out which links to Malcolm’s life later in the scene.We can assume this scene is centred around Malcolm as it’s his view we’re seeing from, it’s also his bag we see on the floor sprinkled with shattered glass as well as earlier the winning of the award. A mid-shot Is used to show Malcolm being protective of his wife. As the couple have now taken off there expensive jackets/cover ups it seems they also lost the power that comes with it. 00:07:08 The camera slowly zooms towards Malcolm and straight cuts back to a point of view shot, as this happens we hear the non- diegetic music increasing the tensio n.As we see Malcolm begin to move we also hear the faint noise of movement from the intruder, this (as well as the camera shot) is allowing the audience to capture that the intruder is standing in the bathroom. We see in a point of view shot to add tension as well as close ups so the audience can see the expression on Malcolm’s face. Though the distance from the bathroom and the position of Malcolm isn’t far at all 13 seconds pass before we discover who is in the room, the time has been stretched out to cause more tension.The first view we get of the bathroom is of the floor as the shot is still from Malcolm’s point of view, the fact we see the floor before the camera moves up shows that he isn’t confident enough to look straight ahead, the shot then is then zoomed out to create a full body shot. it’s obvious the man we see (Vincent) isn’t mentally stable due to the break in, his body language and the fact he’s took the majority of hi s clothes off, knowing this Malcolm speaks quietly trying to keep a clam atmosphere.As Vincent moves towards the door we hear the diagetic sound return, we also see Malcolm and his wife are aware of the danger, when Vincent moves closer and Malcolm steps back. A mid-shot frame is used when Vincent starts to become angry and upset making him unpredictable and therefore more of a risk, the pan across Vincent’s face to allow us to see the emotions and then does the same to Malcolm. Vincents body language also tells the audience how unstable he is, one armis ‘protecting’ him throughout, he’s also very closed and shrugged which also gives off the sense of fear. The scene becomes very quiet with the only sound being whispers and crying. A mid-shot is used as Vincent shoots the gun. High key lighting has been used to show whats going on as it’s done very quickly. The loud gunshot comes as a shock to the audience as it’s been very quiet which adds mo re shock, within seconds Vincent turns the gun on himself.The camera pans while this happens. Malcolm was shot in his rowing jumper, making it ironic that he was shot right in front of his rowing photo in which they all look happy and full of life. 00:10:27 A crane movement is used to end the scene, the screen then fades black and remains silent for a moment before playing the same non-diegetic music as earlier in the scene. The lighting is very dark and the room is a mess which represents the current situation

Monday, January 6, 2020

How Poets Describe Their Attitude to Place in Several...

How Poets Describe Their Attitude to Place in Several Works of Poetry Poets often write about the place they live in or come from. I am going to examine how poets how poets express their relationship to a particular place while considering their intentions, how thoughts and feelings are expressed, the use of language, connections between different poems and include my personal response. In Hotel Room, 12th Floor Norman McCaig is writing about America. We know that he is more precisely writing about New York because he mentions the Empire State Building and the Pan Am skyscraper. We know his place is America because he uses the word sidewalks which is essentially an American terminology†¦show more content†¦These lines state his feeling that no matter how civilised a place may seem or how technologically advanced it may be, there is no way that the primitive urges can be covered over and stopped. McCaig contrasts the sophisticated modern technology of the city with the Wild West. The Wild West dominates over the technology of the city and the technology of the city is being used as a cover for uncivilised ways. McCaig uses time structure of day and night as contrasts and metaphorically personifies midnight in the phrase but now midnight has come in because midnight doesnt literally come in as such. The fact that the second stanza begins with But midnight is not so easily defeated indicates that despite the technology making places civilised, there is still a native and primitive, uncivilised midnight in us all. The phrases warwhoops continually ululating, broken bones, blood glazed on sidewalks and harsh screaming emphasises the brutality of the frontier. The statement not so easily defeated exaggerates the sense that this native reaction is always with us and could be unleashed at any time. Even though the poem Brooklyn Cop by McCaig is essentially about a person rather than a place, it shares the same idea as Hotel Room, 12th Floor. The cop himself seems so civilised at home, but when he is working andShow MoreRelatedSignificance of travel in Bashos Narrow Road Through the Backcountry1431 Words   |  6 PagesJapans natural beauties on his journey for poetic enlightenment and motivation. This work is the story of the journey that BashÃ…  began near the end of his life in order to attain inspiration for writing poetry, specifically in haiku-type forms. BashÃ… s chosen path mirrored that of SaigyÃ… , a well respected monk and poet, which ran through the locations of residence and inspiration of various other notable Japanese poets and writers. The travel tale has long been held in high public regard and is widelyRead MoreFlowered Memories: an Analysis of Ted Hughes Daffodils1319 Words   |  6 Pages‘Imagine what you are writing about. See it and live it. Ââ€"Ted Hughes, Poetry in the Making Edward James Hughes was English Poet Laureate from 1984 to his death in 1998. 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